Rev. John Black, D.D.
[2 October 1768 - 25 October 1849, age 80]
 
3The Rev. John Black, Pastor of the Reformed Presbyterian Church, Pittsburgh, PA from 1800 until
his death in 1849, and Professor of Latin and Greek Ancient Languages at the Western University of Pennsylvania (now the University of Pittsburgh).
Born in County Antrim, Ireland and a graduate of the University of Glasgow, Rev. Black served as Stated Clerk of the Reformed Presbyterian Church from 1802 to 1836 and as Moderator of the RP General Synod
(or New Light) church in 1837.
Speaking of Rev. Black, Samuel Wilson noted that "His power as a pulpit orator won him fame all over the country...As a man of learning he had few equals in his day, and his facile and graceful pen gained him a large circle of admirers." (Wilson, Samuel, McClelland and His Men, date unknown)

[Photograph of the Rev. Dr. John Black, from an original photograph preserved at the PCA Historical Center. The photograph was donated by Mr. Thomas Reid, Jr., Librarian and Archivist at the Reformed Presbyterian Theological Seminary, Pittsburgh, PA]

 

One of Rev. Black's sons, Samuel W. Black, later became the Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the Nebraska Territory in 1857 and fourth Governor of the Territory in 1859. He then served as Colonel of the 62nd Regiment of the Pennsylvania Volunteers but died in battle at Gaines Mills on 26 June 1862.
A daughter, Elizabeth Thomson, married James H. McClelland on 12 February 1835. She had been tutored by her father and is reported to have been a scholar in her own right in both ancient and modern literature.
The funeral sermon for another of Dr. Black's sons, the Rev. Andrew Watson Black, is available here. The sermon, titled "The Dying Christian's Estimate of Heaven," was delivered by his close friend, the Rev. John Niel McLeod.

Additional resources: Dr. Black's "Discourses on Baptism" (1846).
See also, The Last Resting Place of the Rev. John Black, D.D., in the Reformed Presbyterian Advocate, volume 16, number 1 (January 1882), pages 12-14 and 16.9.298301, Some Reminiscences of Rev. John Black, D.D.